21世纪英语快速阅读系列——人生与情感(英汉对照)

21世纪英语快速阅读系列——人生与情感(英汉对照)
ISBN: 
7-5428-3397-9/H.51
开本: 
32开
页码: 
192
定价(元): 
12.00
作者: 
魏欣等编译
  

目录

1. Something's Not Right /1
   总觉得有什么不对
2. To Do or Not to Do /12
   做还是不做
3. The Gift of Life /18
   生命的礼物
4. The Long Walk Home /31
   那漫漫的回家之路……
5. Boy, Interrupted /43
   男孩,生活被打断……
6. Friends /55
   朋友
7. Charlie and the River Rat /67
   查理与“河鼠”
8. If I Were An Angel /79
   如果我是天使
9. Letter to and from Home: 1918 /90
   家信:1918
10. Marriage and Fidelity /101
   婚姻和忠诚
11. Reaching for Perfection /110
   追求完美
12. How Honest Are Couples, Really? /118
   夫妻之间到底有多真诚
13. Maybe A Miracle /128
   可能是奇迹发生了
14. The Healing Power of Forgiveness /140
   宽恕的慰藉力量
15. Angels on the River /151
   水上天使
16. Winning through Surrender /161
   以投降制胜
17. Information Please /168
   问讯台,麻烦你……
18. The Coolest Dad in the Universe /179
   天底下最酷的爸爸
19.The Ice Cream Girl /187
   冰淇淋女孩

内容提要

长期以来,英语学习者由于受汉语思维模式的影响,直接阅读英文报刊上的原作一般总是不得要领。为了让读者提高英语阅读水平,熟悉英语表达习惯,掌握英语语言规律,“21世纪英语快速阅读系列”丛书提供了一批题材多样、内容广泛、语言规范而生动的英语短篇,并按相关主题分成《自然与科技》、《饮食与保健》、《人生与情感》、《教育与就业》4分册。这些短篇大多选自最新出版的英美报纸和杂志。每个短篇后均给出4道阅读自测题,并要求从4个选项(A、B、C和D)中选出最佳选项,其答案附在题后。为了帮助读者更好地理解原文的句子结构,获得准确的相关主题信息,每个短篇均给出了参考译文,且对出现在文章中的生僻单词与词组,以及有别解的常用单词,添加了英汉双语注解。
    本套丛书是中学生、大学生和白领阶层提升英词阅读水平,掌握新颖的英语表达方式,获得自然、科技、饮食、保健、人生、情感、教育、就业等方面最新信息的理想读物。

前言

作者简介

精彩片段

15. Angels on the river

 

一、快速浏览
    Fog filtered the rising sun as a friend drove Dale Buttenhoff into Portland, 
Oregon. "See you tonight," Dale said when he got out. It was a promise, like so 
many others, he didn't intend to keep.
    For the next 45 minutes that damp, cool dawn in March, the 32-year-old 
walked south toward the Willamette River. Around him businesses were beginning 
to open, but with every step, he was closing down. His mind and heart were numb.

 

    Standing on a narrow wooden dock, the planks glistening with dew, Linda 
Stalford glanced around the marina①. She clapped her hands twice, the sound 
crackling across the 400-yard expanse of the murky river. "Let's get it together, 
ladies," she urged.
    Despite the chill, a diverse band of women had come together from all over 
Portland to practice paddling their dragon boat. Young mothers, grandmothers, 
single women, united in friendship and a common cause. Stalford and most of her 
companions wore a pink baseball cap. On it was the word "Survivor."

 

    Dale Buttenhoff turned a corner and started up the walkway of the Ross 
Island Bridge. He was a user②, not a survivor-though he had survived six years 
of methamphetamine③ use and more than one auto accident while bingeing④. He 
also used people. His marriage had ended; he was estranged⑤ from his mother, 
four sisters and his ten-year-old daughter, Ashlee. He was ashamed to face them, 
but not enough to stop using drugs. 

 

    Stalford was the "caller" for today's practice. She sat in the bow, facing 
nine paddlers seated shoulder-to-shoulder, two-by-two. A helmsman⑥ stood at the 
rear, manning the tiller. Compared with some of the paddling teams based out of 
the small marina, they were a ragtag⑦ bunch, their bodies not particularly firm, 
their skills not perfectly honed. But then, Pink Phoenix hadn't been established 
just to win boating competitions. Its purpose was to win a race against breast 
cancer. "Paddles up!" Stalford called out. "Take it away!"

 

    Buttenhoff halted at midspan. As he'd expected, traffic was almost nonexistent 
at 7:30 on a Saturday morning, and he didn't want to be seen. Pulling both hands 
from the pockets of his red parka, he placed them atop the cold concrete bridge 
railing.
    Some 130 feet below ran the Willamette River, gray as winter. Falling to the 
water would be like plunging off a 12-story building. That should be enough, he 
thought. At the very least, it would probably knock him unconscious and he'd 
drown and wash out to sea. And that's what he wanted-to disappear without a trace.

 

    Stalford had been nursing her second child the day she discovered the unusual 
lump in her breast. It was autumn of 1997.,at age 36, the mother of two small 
children was diagnosed with inflammatory breast cancer, highly aggressive.
    Intuitively, Stalford knew she could not win this battle alone. Instead of 
turning away from friends and family, she embraced them, keeping photos of her 
girls at her bedside and leaning on her husband, Matt. Their love helped her 
endure the fear and pain of a modified radical mastectomy, months of chemotherapy, 
a stem-cell transplant and radiation.
    She also embraced outside assistance. When she first heard about Pink Phoenix, 
she had no idea what a dragon boat was, much less how to paddle one. But despite a 
total lack of athletic ability, Linda attended her first outing.
    The weather was miserable-dark, damp and cold, but the group was warm and fun-
loving. Linda confirmed that she was completely incompetent with a paddle. It didn't 
matter. The weekly gatherings on the Willamette became for her a simple metaphor-
these women were all in the same boat, facing reality bravely.
    Dale Buttenhoff leaned over the side of the bridge and looked down at the water. 
"Whoever is listening," her muttered, "please forgive me."
    He took a deep breath. Then he vaulted over the rail.
    The instant his right hand left the railing, Buttenhoff knew he'd made a mistake.
    The fall took about three seconds. It seemed forever. Buttenhoff clawed the air, 
feet flailing. And then he slammed into the water at approximately 60 m.p.h. and sank.
Linda Stalford flinched at an enormous splash some 300 yards ahead to the port side 
of the boat. Just then, one of her teammates shouted, "Something fell off the bridge!"
     "It was a person!" a woman cried.
    Linda turned, spotting an indefinable bright red object in the channel near the 
middle of the river. She nodded to the helmsman. "Paddles up! Let's move!" she yelled.
The Pink Phoenix team fell into rhythm, paddling as one. "Hold on! We're coming!" 
they called out.
    The impact was like a car wreck. But somehow, Buttenhoff survived. He bobbed to 
the surface, dazed but conscious. What he had hoped would be an instant death 
became a slow fight for life. Buttenhoff tried to swim, but the frigid water 
weighted his heavy clothes and filled his boots, tugging him down. He strained 
to keep his face above water. Then, dreamlike, he heard voices. 
    Stalford guided the crew toward the man. Within two minutes they glided 
alongside him. Clearly he was fighting for breath. "Brace the boat!" Linda 
called. The crew laid their paddle blades flat on top of the water to stabilize 
the craft. It was impossible for them to pull him aboard without capsizing⑧, 
but two women in the bow lifted his face from the water and held him up.
    "You're okay," whispered one of the women, her mouth almost to his ear. 
"Help is coming. Just be still." 
    Buttenhoff gasped, his body limp. "I'm sorry," he muttered, over and over. 
"I'm so sorry. I'm so sorry." He was apologizing to his daughter, Ashlee. To 
his mother. To the women who were holding him now. he was apologizing to his 
ex-wife, to God and to himself.
    A hush fell over the boat as the crew realized what had happened. Better 
than most, they understood despair. So they didn't condemn the man.
    Physically, Dale's injuries were slight-bruising in his legs, hips and back. 
Emotionally, the scars ran deep. But the second night in the hospital he admitted 
to his mother for the first time he wanted help. Linda Stalford and teammate Joan 
Cavanagh came to visit. They arrived bearing gifts --- a frame for his daughter's 
photo, a Bible and Linda's personal symbol of hope, a bouquet of tulips. "Hi, 
we're from the boat." Linda said.
    Dale smiled shyly, embarrassed but grateful. He was in awe of their courage, 
passion for life, their giving nature and their inner peace. Now he wanted those 
things too. "Thank you," he said as the three of them shared a lingering hug.
    Dale was "adopted" by Linda and the women of Pink Phoenix, his new role 
models. He attended their functions, cheered them in competition and learned from 
their vigor. Today Dale remains drug-free. Now he plans to return to school and 
become a counselor in the drug program he completed. He also continues his 
involvement with Pink Phoenix, as they do with him. "I want them to be proud of 
me," said Dale. " I want them to know that what they did for was not in vain."

 

二、阅读自测
1. Dale Buttenhoff and " Pink Phoenix" meet________.
A. by accident   
B. purposefully   
C. by others' introduction  
D. with arrangement

 

2. The theme of the organization of " Pink Phoenix" is___________.
A. to win dragon boat competition     
B. to have a strong physical body
C. to fight against difficult realities         
D. to make the members more sociable

 

3. Buttendoff wants to kill himself because _________.
A. his family is ended 
B. his daughter and mother treat him as a stranger
C. he loses his job          
D. he is too addicted to drugs that he can't quit

 

4. "He(Dale) attended their functions, cheered them in competition" (in the last 
paragraph), the meaning of "function" maybe _______.
A. a specific occupation or role   
B. an official ceremony or a formal social occasion
C. assigned duty or activity     
D. competition

 


三、答案
1. A      2. C       3. D        4. B

 

四、参考译文
                水上天使

 

    晨雾围住了冉冉上升的太阳,一位朋友开着车把戴尔·巴特霍夫送到了俄勒冈州的波特兰。“晚上见。”戴尔下车时说道。但就像许多其他的承诺一样,他并不打算实现它。
    这是个3月份潮湿、寒冷的黎明,之后的45分钟里,32岁的他一直向南部的威拉米特河走。他身边一家家商铺开始了一天的生意,而在他心里,他的每一步却都在趋向结束。他的心智已麻木了。

 

    木船坞的铺板带着闪闪发光的露水,而琳达·斯戴尔夫正站在这窄窄的木船坞上,向码头周围张望。接着她拍了两下手掌,掌声在400码宽的黑暗河面上脆生生地传出老远。她催促道:“集合,女士们!”
    即使天气寒冷,一群来自波特兰的不同年龄段的妇女还是集中到了一起,练习划龙舟。当中有年轻的母亲、作了祖母的,还有单身妇女,友谊和某个共同理由将她们紧紧联系在了一起。斯戴尔夫和大部分组员带着一顶粉红色的棒球帽,上面写着“幸存者”。

 

    戴尔·巴特霍夫转过一个拐角,走上罗斯岛大桥的人行道。他是一个吸毒者,而不是“幸存者”——尽管他服用了6年甲基苯异丙胺兴奋剂,而且在狂欢作乐时不止一次导致车祸,但他依然幸存着。他还利用着周围的人。他的婚姻已画上句号,和他的母亲、4位姊妹,还有10岁的女儿阿什尼,已形同末路。他无颜面再见她们,但这不足以让他停止吸毒。

 

    斯戴尔夫是今天训练的召集者。她坐在船首,面对着9位划浆手,她们两个对两个,肩靠肩地坐着。一位舵手站在船尾执掌舵柄。和小码头外的一些划艇队相比,她们真不算什么:身体不是非常强壮,技术不是非常过硬。但是,建立“粉色凤凰”并不只是为了赢划艇比赛,它的目的是要赢得和乳癌斗争的胜利。斯戴尔夫叫道:“举浆,开船!”

 

    巴特霍夫走到桥中间停住了。正如他所料,星期六早上7:30分几乎没有什么来往车辆,因为他不想被人看见。他将双手从红色皮大衣口袋里抽出来,放在了冰冷的大桥栏杆上。
    脚下130英尺威拉米特河水在奔腾,晦色如冬。往水中跳就像从12层建筑物上跳下一样。他想,那该足够了,至少会把他击昏,然后把他淹死,冲到海里去。那就是他想要的结果——毫无踪迹地消失。

 

    斯戴尔夫是在养育第二个孩子时,发现胸部不正常肿块的。那是1997年秋天,这位两个年幼孩子的母亲被诊断出患了炎性乳癌,很危险。
    斯戴尔夫本能地知道靠她个人无法战胜病魔。她没有躲避朋友和家人,而是拥抱他们,将孩子们的相片放在床头,并依靠她的丈夫马特。他们的爱使她承受住了改良型乳房全切除手术、达数月之久的化疗、干细胞移植和放射疗法带来的恐惧和痛苦。
    她也接受外部援助。当她第一次听说“粉色凤凰”的时候,她还不知道龙舟是什么,更不知道如何划桨。但是即使琳达一点运动能力都没有,她还是参加了她的第一次户外活动。
    天气遭透了——漆黑、潮湿、寒冷,但是大家心里暖融融的,彼此嬉笑取乐。琳达肯定自己是没有能力对付划桨的,但那没有关系。每周一次在威拉米特河上的集会对她来说成为了一个简单的象征——这些妇女在同一条船上,共同勇敢面对残酷事实。

 

    戴尔·巴特霍夫靠在桥栏杆上,俯身往下看着河水,咕咕哝哝地说:“无论谁在倾听,请宽恕我。”
他深吸了一口气,接着纵身翻下了栏杆。
    右手离开栏杆的一霎那,巴特霍夫知道自己做错了。
    坠落过程持续了3秒钟,但又像过了很久。巴特霍夫在空中手抓足蹬,然后以每小时约60英里的速度撞入水中,往下沉了下去。
    琳达·斯戴尔夫依稀瞧见船的左舷约300码的地方飞溅起一个巨大的水花。紧接着,她的一位队友叫道:“有什么掉下桥了!”
    “是一个人!”另外一个女人叫道。
    琳达转过身来,在靠近河道中间的地方发现一个模糊的鲜红色物体。她对舵手点点头,叫道:“举浆!前进!”
    “粉色凤凰”队开始节奏划一地抡开了船桨,并叫道:“坚持!我们来了!”
    与河水的碰撞有点像汽车事故,但是不知何故,巴特霍夫没死。他挣扎着浮到水面,虽然头昏眼花,但还是有意识。他本想要的速死成了缓慢求生。巴特霍夫试图游泳,但是寒冷的水使衣服变得很重,靴子里也满是水,在往下拽他。他使劲要把头露在水面上,接着像做梦似的,他听到了人的声音。
    斯戴尔夫领着船队向落水男人身边划来,两分钟就划到了他身边。很显然他在想尽办法呼吸。琳达叫道:“撑住船!”船员们把浆平放在水上稳住船。虽然把他拉上船很可能会把船弄翻的,但是船上的两位妇女还是在船头把他的头托起来,并把他弄了上来。 
    一位妇女嘴巴几乎贴着他的耳朵,轻轻对他说:“你没事了。有人来帮你了,别动。”
    巴特霍夫四肢瘫软喘着气。他不停地轻声说:“对不起,对不起,对不起。”他是在对女儿阿什尼道歉,对他的母亲、身边这些抱着他的妇女们,对他的前妻、上帝和自己道歉。
    船上的人意识到到底发生了什么,大家一下子静了下来。所幸大家都明白绝望的滋味,所以她们都没有指责这位可怜的人。
    戴尔身体上的伤害是轻微的——只是腿部、臀部和背部擦伤,但精神上的创伤却是颇深的。但是第二天晚上在医院里,他向母亲第一次承认他需要帮助。琳达·斯戴尔夫和她的队友琼·凯文娜来看他,她们带来了礼物——一个用于装他女儿照片的像框、一本《圣经》,和琳达自认为是希望的象征:一束郁金香。琳达打招呼道:“嘿,我们是船上的那些人。”
    戴尔羞涩地微笑着,又尴尬又感激。他对她们的勇气,她们对生活的激情,她们乐善好施的本性和内心的平和感到敬畏。现在他也需要这些东西。他回答说:“谢谢。”3人久久地拥抱在一起。
    戴尔被他新的人生典范——琳达和“粉色凤凰”的成员——“感化”了。他参加她们的活动,在比赛中为她们喊加油,学习她们的生命活力。一直到现在,戴尔没再吸过毒。他现在计划回学校读书,想成为毒品问题的法律顾问,而那段吸毒史他已终结了。他继续在和“粉色凤凰”交往,她们也和他保持联系。戴尔说:“我想让她们为我感到骄傲,我想让她们知道她们为我做的一切不是徒劳无功的。”

 

五:词语注释:
① marin:n. a boat basin that has docks, moorings, supplies, and other facilities 
for small boats 码头
② user:n. one who uses addictive drugs 使用酒精、饮料或麻醉剂的人
③ methamphetamine:n. [药]甲基苯丙胺,脱氧麻黄碱( 中枢兴奋药)
④ binge:v. a period of excessive or uncontrolled indulgence in food or drink 狂饮作乐
⑤ estrange:v. to make hostile, unsympathetic, or indifferent; alienate 隔离;远离;使离开
⑥ helmsman:n. a person who steers a ship 操舵员,舵手给船操舵的人
⑦ ragtag:adj. shaggy or unkempt; ragged 破烂的,不整洁的;破旧的
⑧ capsize:v. to overturn or cause to overturn 翻船,翻车

书评

资料下载